Study

Evaluating success of translocations in maintaining genetic diversity in a threatened mammal

  • Published source details Ottewell K., Dunlop J., Thomas N., Morris K., Coates D. & Byrne M. (2014) Evaluating success of translocations in maintaining genetic diversity in a threatened mammal. Biological Conservation, 171, 209-219

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals to islands without invasive predators

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated mammals into fenced areas

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals to islands without invasive predators

    A replicated study in 2010–2013 on two islands in Western Australia, Australia (Ottewell et al. 2014) found that wild-born golden bandicoots Isoodon auratus, descended from translocated populations which had been released onto two predator-free islands, maintained genetic diversity relative to founder and source populations and persisted for 2–3 years. For four measures of genetic diversity (allelic richness, the number of effective alleles/locus, observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity) there were no significant differences between descendants from translocated animals, founder animals that were translocated or source populations (see paper for details). On the larger island, the population size was estimated to be 280 animals in 2013. No estimate is provided for the smaller island. Bandicoots were trapped on Barrow Island, which has a large population, in February 2010 (165 animals) and July 2011 (92 animals). Within 24 h of capture they were released on two other islands (1,020 and 261 ha) where non-native predators had been eradicated or had never been recorded. Genetic material was sampled by ear punch biopsy from 38 and 49 founders in 2010 and 2011, and from 44 and 39 wild-born offspring in 2010–2012.

  2. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control

    A study in 2010–2013 at a grassland and woodland site in Western Australia, Australia (Ottewell et al. 2014) found that wild-born golden bandicoots Isoodon auratus, descended from a translocated population which had been released into a predator-free enclosure, maintained genetic diversity relative to the founder and source populations and persisted for three years. For four measures of genetic diversity (allelic richness, the number of effective alleles per locus, observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity) there were no significant differences between descendants from translocated animals, founder animals that were translocated or source populations (see paper for details). The population size was estimated at 249 bandicoots in 2013. One hundred and sixty bandicoots were trapped on Barrow Island, which has a large population, in February 2010. They were released into a 1,100-ha enclosure free from introduced predators within 24 h of capture. Genetic material was sampled by ear punch biopsy from 57 founders in 2010 and from 67 wild-born progeny trapped in 2010–2012.

  3. Release translocated mammals into fenced areas

    A study in 2010–2013 at a grassland and woodland site in Western Australia, Australia (Ottewell et al. 2014) found that wild-born golden bandicoots Isoodon auratus, descended from a translocated population which had been released into a fenced area free from non-native predators, maintained genetic diversity relative to the founder and source populations and persisted for three years. For four measures of genetic diversity (allelic richness, the number of effective alleles per locus, observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity) there were no significant differences between descendants from translocated animals, founder animals that were translocated or source populations (see paper for details). The population size was estimated at 249 bandicoots in 2013. One hundred and sixty bandicoots were trapped on Barrow Island, which had a large population, in February 2010. They were released into a 1,100-ha enclosure free from introduced predators within 24 h of capture. Genetic material was sampled by ear punch biopsy from 57 founders in 2010 and from 67 wild-born progeny trapped in 2010–2012.

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 17

Go to the CE Journal

Subscribe to our newsletter

Please add your details if you are interested in receiving updates from the Conservation Evidence team about new papers, synopses and opportunities.

Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust