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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Survival and causes of death among released brown hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas, 1778) in Central Poland

Published source details

Misiorowska M. & Wasilewski M. (2012) Survival and causes of death among released brown hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas, 1778) in Central Poland. Acta Theriologica, 57, 305-312


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2005–2009 in a mostly agricultural area in Maciejowice, Poland (Misiorowska & Wasilewski 2012) found that approximately one third of released captive-bred brown hares Lepus europaeus survived for at least one year. Twenty-two of 60 hares (37%) survived for at least one year after release. Of those that died during the first year after release, males survived for an average of 57 days and females for an average of 64 days. Deaths were due to predation (31%), poaching (13%) and road kills (7%), with the remainder (49%) disappearing or dying of unknown causes. Seventy-eight brown hares bred in a 20-ha open-field enclosure were released in a landscape comprising cultivated fields, floodbanks, forest, orchards and meadows. The hares (at least six months old) were released in groups of 18–30 individuals in November 2005, 2006 and 2007. Sixty radio-collared hares (15–29 hares/group) were tracked 3–7 times/week for 1–2 years after release in 2005–2009.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)