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Individual study: Superovulation, in vivo embryo recovery and cryopreservation for Aoudad (Ammotragus lervia) females using osmotic pumps and vitrification: a preliminary experience and its implications for conservation

Published source details

Lopez-Saucedo J., Ramon-Ugalde J.P., Barroso-Padilla J.D., Gutierrez-Gutierrez A.M., Fierro R. & Pina-Aguilar R.E. (2013) Superovulation, in vivo embryo recovery and cryopreservation for Aoudad (Ammotragus lervia) females using osmotic pumps and vitrification: a preliminary experience and its implications for conservation. Tropical Conservation Science, 6, 149-157


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Preserve genetic material for use in future captive breeding programs Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study (date not stated) in a zoo in Mexico (López–Saucedo et al. 2013) found that using a series of non-traditional techniques, combined with natural mating, five embryos were produced from aoudad Ammotragus lervia that could be cryogenically preserved. The five embryos were obtained from just one of the three female aoudad, with the low embryo recovery rate being due to a low level of fertilization in vivo. The oestrus and superovulation of three female aoudad were synchronized. Procedures followed those used for domestic sheep combined with subcutaneous osmotic pumps for delivering the follicle-stimulating hormone. An aoudad ram was introduced for natural mating at the anticipated time of oestrous. Embryos were collected five and a half days later by incision through the abdominal wall. Embryos were cryopreserved, for use in conservation breeding programs (potentially by transferring to surrogates, such as domestic hybrids between aoudad and sheep or goats).

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)