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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Do wildlife passages act as prey-traps?

Published source details

Little S.J., Harcourt R.G. & Clevenger A.P. (2002) Do wildlife passages act as prey-traps? Biological Conservation, 107, 135-145


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install tunnels/culverts/underpass under railways Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review in 2000 of studies investigating whether mammalian predators use wildlife passages under railways and roads as ‘prey-traps’ (Little et al. 2002) found that most studies recorded no evidence of predation in or around passages. Evidence suggested that predator species used different passages to their prey. Only one study, in Australia, suggested that tunnels increased predation risk and that recorded only one predator in tunnels. However, no studies specifically investigated predator activity, densities or predation rates, or predator-induced prey mortality at passage sites relative to control sites away from passages, or before-and-after passage construction. A literature survey was carried out in July 2000 using BIOSIS (Biological Abstracts) and Proceedings of the First, Second and Third International Conference on Wildlife Ecology and Transportation.

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)

Install tunnels/culverts/underpass under roads Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review in 2000 of studies investigating whether mammalian predators use wildlife passages under roads and railways as ‘prey-traps’ (Little et al. 2002) found that most studies recorded no evidence of predation in or around passages. Evidence suggested that predator species used different passages to their prey. Only one study, in Australia, suggested that tunnels increased predation risk and that study recorded only one predator in tunnels. However, no studies specifically investigated predator activity, densities or predation rates, or predator-induced prey mortality at passage sites relative to control sites away from passages, or before-and-after passage construction. A literature survey was carried out in July 2000 using BIOSIS (Biological Abstracts) and Proceedings of the First, Second and Third International Conference on Wildlife Ecology and Transportation.

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)