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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Small mammals and retention islands: An experimental study of animal response to alternative logging practices

Published source details

Lindenmayer D.B., Knight E., McBurney L., Michael D. & Banks S.C. (2010) Small mammals and retention islands: An experimental study of animal response to alternative logging practices. Forest Ecology and Management, 260, 2070-2078


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use patch retention harvesting instead of clearcutting Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 2002–2009 of forest across three districts in Victoria, Australia (Lindenmayer et al. 2010) found that retaining forest islands when clearfelling reduced subsequent abundance declines after brash burning for some small mammal relative to in clearfelled areas. Average bush rat Rattus fuscipes abundance declined less following burning in island retention patches (before: 2.1; after: 1.6/grid) than in clearfelled patches (before: 1.2; after: 0.4/grid). Female agile antechinus Antechinus agilis abundance declined less following burning in island retention patches (before: 2.2; after: 1.5/grid) than in clearfelled patches (before: 1.0; after: 0.1/grid). However, male agile antechinus abundance declines were similar following burning in island retention patches (before: 1.1; after: 0.4/grid) and clearfelled patches (before: 0.5; after: 0.2/grid). Forest patches (coupes) of ≥15 ha were established in six blocks. In each block, one patch was entirely clearfelled, one was clearfelled, but retaining a 1.5-ha forest island and one was clearfelled, but retaining three 0.5-ha islands. Post-felling, blocks were prescribed burned to clear brash. Small mammals were surveyed using four live-trap grids in each patch. Three grids/patch were in retained forest islands. Surveys took place before felling, after felling and after burning. Treatments were staggered, so surveys spanned 2002 to 2009.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)