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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: EcoFire: restoring the biodiversity values of the Kimberley region by managing fire

Published source details

Legge S., Murphy S.A., Kingswood R., Maher B. & Swan D. (2011) EcoFire: restoring the biodiversity values of the Kimberley region by managing fire. Ecological Management & Restoration, 12, 84-92


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use prescribed burning Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2004–2010 of grassland in Western Australia, Australia (Legge et al. 2011) found that prescribed burns early in the dry season resulted in higher abundance and species richness of small mammals relative to extensive mid- to late-dry season wildfires. More mammals were found in plots with prescribed burning (5.7/plot) than in areas subject to wildfire (3.5/plot). The same was true for species richness (prescribed burning: 1.4/plot; wildfire: 1.1/plot). Fire history was determined from satellite imagery from 1999–2010. Prescribed burning was initiated in 2004. Areas burned less frequently than average were regarded as being managed by prescribed burning, earlier in the dry season. Areas burned more frequently than average were regarded as being wildfire areas, burned later in the dry season. Forty small mammal traps/0.25-ha plot were operated for 120 trap-nights/year. The number of plots surveyed is not stated.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)