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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Electric fencing as a measure to reduce moose–vehicle collisions

Published source details

Leblond M., Dussault C., Ouellet J.-., Poulin M., Courtois R. & Fortin J. (2007) Electric fencing as a measure to reduce moose–vehicle collisions. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 71, 1695-1703


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install barrier fencing along roads Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 2003–2005 along two highways in Québec, Canada (Leblond et al. 2007) found that electric fences, along with an underpass beneath one highway, reduced moose Alces alces access to highways and moose-vehicle collisions. There were fewer moose-vehicle collisions after fence construction (zero) than before (1–5/year) and moose tracks on the road decreased by 76–84%. Only 33% (of 53) of moose tracks on the road were from moose that had crossed a fence; most entered through vehicle access routes (31%) or at fence ends (7%). Fences prevented 78% (7/9) of radio-collared moose from crossing the highway. Electric fences (1.5 m high, cables 0.3 m apart) were installed along both sides of a 5-km section of Highway 175 in 2002 and a 10-km section of Highway 169 in 2004 (both two-lane). Moose were monitored along fenced and adjacent equal-length unfenced road sections using weekly track surveys in May–August of 2003–2005. GPS collars were fitted to 47 moose and locations recorded every 2–3 hours for 1–3 years. An underpass was constructed along one highway (23 m long, 16 m wide, 7 m high) and a fence opening on the other (that triggered dynamic warning road signs).

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)

Install barrier fencing and underpasses along roads Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1990–2005 along a highway in Québec, Canada (Leblond et al. 2007) found that an underpass was used by moose Alces alces and, along with electric fences, it reduced moose-vehicle collisions. Twenty-three sets of moose tracks were recorded in the underpass over three years. There were fewer moose-vehicle collisions after fence construction (zero) than before (1.4/year). An underpass (23 m long, 16 m wide, 7 m high) was established along both side of a river, under a bridge along the highway. Electric fences (1.5 m high, wires 0.3 m apart) were installed along both sides of a 5-km highway section, encompassing the underpass, in 2002. Data on moose-vehicle collisions before fence installation were collated by the Ministère des Transports du Québec, between 1990 and 2002. Details of monitoring collisions after installation are not given.

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)