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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Short term response of small mammals and forest birds to silvicultural practices differing in tree retention in irregular boreal forests

Published source details

Le Blanc M.L., Fortin D., Darveau M. & Ruel J.C. (2010) Short term response of small mammals and forest birds to silvicultural practices differing in tree retention in irregular boreal forests. Écoscience, 17, 334-342


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use selective harvesting instead of clearcutting Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2006–2007 in a mixed temperate forest in Quebec, Canada (Le Blanc et al. 2010) found that harvesting trees selectively did not result in higher small mammal species richness or abundance compared to clearcutting. Small mammal species richness did not vary along a gradient of retained conifer basal area that resulted from different felling densities (result presented as statistical model coefficient). The combined abundances of red-backed voles Myodes gapperi, masked shrews Sorex cinereus and deer mice Peromyscus maniculatus (which comprised 92% of individuals caught) did not vary with conifer basal area (result presented as statistical model coefficient). Four tree blocks were harvested in 2004–2005. Three or four harvesting treatments (each 20 ha extent) were applied in each block. Selective harvesting resulted in retention of 17–23%, 57–69% or 60–73% of standing timber. Clearcut areas had <10% of timber remaining. Small mammals were live-trapped, between 3 July and 25 August in 2006 and 2007.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)