Study

Age, sex and relocation distance as predictors of return for relocated nuisance black bears Ursus americanus in Ontario, Canada

  • Published source details Landriault L.J., Brown G.S., Hamr J. & Mallory F.F. (2009) Age, sex and relocation distance as predictors of return for relocated nuisance black bears Ursus americanus in Ontario, Canada. Wildlife Biology, 15, 155-164

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate problem mammals away from residential areas (e.g. habituated bears) to reduce human-wildlife conflict

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Translocate problem mammals away from residential areas (e.g. habituated bears) to reduce human-wildlife conflict

    A replicated study in 1982–1997 in three mainly forested areas in Ontario, Canada (Landriault et al. 2009) found that translocating black bears Ursus americanus that caused nuisance around habitation or other human-related installations reduced their nuisance behaviour, though some animals continued to cause problems. Among translocated bears, ≥30% were involved in at least one further nuisance event. This occurred mostly in adult females (48%), followed by adult males (39%), juvenile females (26%) and juvenile males (18%). Seventy-three percent of translocated adult bears returned to their area of capture, compared to 29% of juveniles. Bears released further from their capture point were less likely to return (data presented as statistical model coefficients). In each of three regions, bear relocation and tag recovery data were obtained. In total, 123 bears were relocated after displaying nuisance behaviour, and were moved on average 70–80 km. Study periods in the three areas spanned three, four and 14 years.

    (Summarised by: Nick Littlewood)

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