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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The effects of captive experience on reintroduction survival in carnivores: A review and analysis

Published source details

Jule K.R., Leaver L.A. & Lea S.E.G. (2008) The effects of captive experience on reintroduction survival in carnivores: A review and analysis. Biological Conservation, 141, 355-363


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review in 2008 of 49 studies in 1990–2006 of carnivore reintroductions in Africa, Europe, and North America (Jule et al. 2008) found that captive-bred animals released into the wild had lower survival than did wild-born translocated animals. Survival of captive-born carnivores following release (32%) was lower than survival of wild-born translocated animals (53%). The review analysed 20 reintroductions of 983 captive-bred carnivores and 29 reintroductions of 1,169 wild-caught carnivores. Post-release monitoring ranged in duration from 6 to 18 months.

(Summarised by Matt Rogan )

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review in 2008 of 49 studies in 1990–2006 of carnivore reintroductions in Africa, Europe, and North America (Jule et al. 2008) found that wild-born translocated animals had higher survival rates than did released captive-bred animals. Survival of wild-born translocated carnivores (53%) was higher than survival of captive-born animals following release (32%). The review analysed 20 reintroductions of 983 captive-bred carnivores and 29 reintroductions of 1,169 wild-caught carnivores. Post-release monitoring ranged in duration from 6 to 18 months.

(Summarised by Matt Rogan)