Study

Influence of social organization on dispersal and survival of translocated female white-tailed deer

  • Published source details Jones M.L., Mathews N.E. & Porter W.F. (1997) Influence of social organization on dispersal and survival of translocated female white-tailed deer. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 25, 272-278

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate mammals to reduce overpopulation

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Translocate mammals to reduce overpopulation

    A study in 1993–1995 in a forest reserve in New York, USA (Jones et al. 1997) found that following translocation to reduce over-abundance at the source site, white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus had lower survival rates but similar home range sizes compared to non-translocated deer at the recipient site. One year after release, the annual survival rate for translocated deer (53%) was lower than that of non-translocated deer at the recipient site (75–88%). During the year after release, average home range sizes did not differ significantly between translocated deer (0.23 km2) and non-translocated deer at the recipient site (0.22 km2). In May–June 1994, seventeen female white-tailed deer were translocated from an over-populated site to a site 60 km away. In April–July of 1993–1995, twenty deer resident at the recipient site (16 females, 4 males) were captured. All deer were radio-collared. Before release, deer were held for 1–12 days in a 50-m2 pen. Deer were monitored using radio-telemetry, 5–15 times/week, in April–August of 1993–1995, and less frequently at other times of the year.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  2. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

    A replicated controlled study in 1993–1995 in a mixed hardwood and conifer forest reserve in New York, USA (Jones et al. 1997) found that white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus translocated as a social group did not differ in survival or average dispersal distance compared to deer translocated as an unrelated group and deer translocated together did not stay together, regardless of whether they had previously been part of the same social group or not. Survival rates in the first year after release were similar for translocated deer from the same social group (6/12 individuals, 50%) as for those from unrelated social groups (3/5 individuals, 60%). Survival rates of translocated deer were lower than resident deer in 1993-1995 (75-88%). Deer released together did not remain together regardless of whether they had originated from the same social group or not. The average dispersal distance of deer translocated as a social group (24 km) was similar to those translocated in a group of unrelated deer (22 km). Between May-June 1994, seventeen female white-tailed deer were caught and translocated 60 km from one hardwood and coniferous forest to another (1,133 ha). Twelve were translocated from the same social group (released in groups of 1-5 animals) and five were unrelated animals (released in a group of 3 animals or individually). Each deer was ear-tagged and radio-collared. Resident deer were radio-tracked 5–15 times/week in the source forest April-August 1993-1995 and translocated deer were radio-tracked in the destination forest 1-15 times/week in May-August 1994 and 1995, every few months in September-December 1994 and 1-8 times/month in January-March 1995.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

Output references

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