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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Using electric fences to reduce Asiatic black bear depredation in Nagano Prefecture, central Japan

Published source details

Huygens O.C. & Hayashi H. (1999) Using electric fences to reduce Asiatic black bear depredation in Nagano Prefecture, central Japan. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 27, 959-964


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install electric fencing to protect crops from mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in 1997–1998 of 24 crop fields and two areas of beehives adjacent to woodlands in Nagano prefecture, Japan (Huygens & Hayashi 1999) found that electric fences prevented raids by Asiatic black bears Ursus thibetanus. No bears got through any of the electric fences. Bear activity near fences was documented 23 times, including three bears departing after touching the fence, one trying unsuccessfully to dig under the fence and eight raids on unprotected fields within 13–120 m of fences. In July–October of 1997 and 1998, twenty-four sweetcorn fields and two areas of beehives (area enclosed 0.001–0.75 ha) with recent history of bear-raids were fenced using Gallagher power fence systems for 2–65 nights/fence. Fences comprised four wires at 24 cm intervals with a further wire 30 cm outside the fence and 30 cm above the ground.

(Summarised by Jack Gavigan )