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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effectiveness of newly-designed electric fences in reducing crop damage by medium and large mammals

Published source details

Honda T., Miyagawa Y., Ueda H. & Inoue M. (2009) Effectiveness of newly-designed electric fences in reducing crop damage by medium and large mammals. Mammal Study, 34, 13-17


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Install electric fencing to protect crops from mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2007–2008 of three fences in Japan (Honda et al. 2009) found that electric fencing was effective at excluding a range of large and medium-sized wild mammals. No mammals were recorded inside any fences. Outside the lowest fence, there were 157 occurrences of eight species. Outside the intermediate-height fence, there were 96 occurrences of eight species. Outside the highest fence, there were 117 occurrences of three species. Japanese macaques Macaca fuscata, which can climb non-electrified fences, were among animals excluded at the highest fence. Fences enclosed areas of 100–930 m2. They comprised metallic 15 × 29 mm mesh in 0.6-m-high × 1.8-m-wide sections. The lowest fence (0.6 m high) was a single section high. The intermediate fence (1.6 m high) comprised a single wire between two mesh sections. The highest fence (1.8 m high) comprised three wires and nylon netting between two mesh sections, with two ground wires above. A current (2,000–6,500 V) ran through metallic parts. A corrugated polyvinyl chloride sheet insulated the fence bottom from the ground.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)