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Individual study: A low-cost, low-labor-intensity electric fence effective against wild boar, sika deer, Japanese macaque and medium-sized mammals

Published source details

Honda T., Kuwata H., Yamasaki S. & Miyagawa Y. (2011) A low-cost, low-labor-intensity electric fence effective against wild boar, sika deer, Japanese macaque and medium-sized mammals. Mammal Study, 36, 113-117


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Install electric fencing to protect crops from mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in 2010 at four arable sites in Japan (Honda et al. 2011) found that a modified electric fence design was effective at excluding large and medium-sized mammals from crops. Fewer animals were recorded inside fences (0–3) than outside fences (60–327). Racoon dog Nyctereutes procyonoides (one occurrence), sika deer Cervus nippon (two) and wild boar Sus scrofa (one) crossed fences. The most frequently recorded mammals outside fences were wild boar (112 occurrences), sika deer (373) and Japanese macaque Macaca fuscata (117). Four fences enclosed cops covering 100–1,700 m2. They comprised insulated fiberglass poles (8.5 mm diameter, 2.1 m long) at 2.5-m intervals. Nine electrified wires (0.9 mm diameter) were attached, up to 1.7 m high. Nylon net (45-mm mesh) was attached to the full fence height. Poles were flexible, so animals attempting to climb would retain ground contact and hence be shocked. Measured voltages were 3,600–6,800 V. Fences were checked at least weekly. Animals were monitored inside and outside fences using infrared-triggered cameras for ≥5 months from April–November 2010.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)