Study

Efficacy of two lion conservation programs in Maasailand, Kenya

  • Published source details Hazzah L., Dolrenry S., Naughton L., Edwards C.T.T., Mwebi O., Kearney F. & Frank L. (2014) Efficacy of two lion conservation programs in Maasailand, Kenya. Conservation Biology, 28, 851-860

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Train and support local staff to help reduce persecution of mammals

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Pay farmers to compensate for losses due to predators/wild herbivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Train and support local staff to help reduce persecution of mammals

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 2003–2011 in savanna grassland in four ranches in southern Kenya (Hazzah et al. 2014) found that employing local tribesmen to dissuade pastoralists from killing lions Panthera leo and to assist with livestock protection measures, alongside compensating for livestock killed by lions, reduced lion killings by pastoralists. The two schemes occurred at the same time at three group ranches, so their individual effects could not be separated. Compensation for livestock losses was estimated to reduce lion killing by 87–91% whilst additionally employing lion guardians reduced killings by 99%. The four ranches comprised a 3,500-km2 study area. Compensation for verified livestock losses to lions was initiated at three of the group ranches between 2003 and 2008. Respected tribesmen, ‘lion guardians’, were employed to dissuade pastoralists from killing lions and to assist with livestock protection measures, such as reinforcing bomas. The scheme commenced at the four sites between 2007 and 2010. Lion mortality data, from 2003 to 2011, were collated primarily from community informants and direct interviews with lion hunters.

  2. Pay farmers to compensate for losses due to predators/wild herbivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 2003–2011 of savanna grassland across three adjacent group ranches in southern Kenya (Hazzah et al. 2014) found that compensating for livestock predated by lions Panthera leo reduced lion killings by pastoralists. Prior to offering compensation, up to 25 lions/year were killed on two ranches and up to 10/year on the third. After introducing compensation payments, 2–15 lions/year were killed on two ranches and none was recorded killed on the third ranch. Compensating for loses was overall estimated to reduce lion killing by 87–91%. Compensation was paid for verified livestock losses to lions at the three group ranches between 2003 and 2008. Lion mortality data from 2003 to 2011 were collated primarily from community informants and direct interviews with lion hunters.

Output references

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