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Individual study: Disentangling the importance of interspecific competition, food availability, and habitat in species occupancy: Recolonization of the endangered Fennoscandian arctic fox

Published source details

Hamel S., Killengreen S.T., Henden J.A., Yoccoz N.G. & Ims R.A. (2013) Disentangling the importance of interspecific competition, food availability, and habitat in species occupancy: Recolonization of the endangered Fennoscandian arctic fox. Biological Conservation, 160, 114-120


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Remove or control competitors Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A controlled study in 2005–2010 in 25 tundra sites in Finnmark, Norway (Hamel et al. 2013) found that the probability of colonization by arctic fox Vulpes lagopus was higher in sites where red foxes Vulpes vulpes had been controlled. Arctic foxes colonized some sites where red foxes were controlled but their probability of colonizing sites without fox control was zero (reported as statistical model results). Between 2005 and 2010, intensive culling removed 885 red foxes from the Varanger peninsula. Foxes were monitored annually, over a 2-month period in late winter, using automatic digital cameras in front of a frozen block of reindeer remains. Fifteen camera sites were located across the area where red foxes were controlled and 10 areas without control (Nordkynn peninsula and Ifjordfjellet). Each camera took photographs of the carcass and its close surroundings every 10 min.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)