Study

Effectiveness of electric fences as a means to prevent Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) predation on lambs

  • Published source details Garrote G., Lopez G., Ruiz M., De Lillo S., Bueno J.F. & Simon M.A. (2015) Effectiveness of electric fences as a means to prevent Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) predation on lambs. Hystrix, the Italian Journal of Mammalogy (English, 1994-), 26, 61-62.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Install electric fencing to reduce predation of livestock by mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Install electric fencing to reduce predation of livestock by mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 2012–2014 of two sheep flocks in Mediterranean forests and scrubland in Andalusia, Spain (Garrotea et al. 2015) found that electric fences prevented night-time predation by Iberian lynx Lynx pardinus. Over one winter and two spring lambing seasons following fence installation, no lynx or other predator attacks occurred inside fences. During the winter lambing season before fence installation, there were seven night-time predation events, involving 13 lambs. Electric fences (75 m perimeter, 106 cm high) were installed in early March 2013 (before the spring lambing season) for two sheep flocks. Fences contained a live braided plastic rope. Above the mesh were two 4-cm-wide conductor strips, giving a total height of 160 cm. Fences were powered from a solar rechargeable battery. Sheep were contained at night, but roamed freely, and suffered attacks, during daytime. All predator attacks on the two flocks were documented from December 2012 to May 2014.

    (Summarised by: Nick Littlewood)

Output references
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