Study

Translocation of nine-banded armadillos

  • Published source details Gammons D.J., Mengak M.T. & Conner L.M. (2009) Translocation of nine-banded armadillos. Human Wildlife Interactions, 3, 64

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range

    A randomized, controlled study in 2005–2006 in a plantation in Georgia, USA (Gammons et al. 2009) found that most translocated nine-banded armadillos Dasypus novemcinctus dispersed from their release site within the first few days after release. Eleven out of 12 translocated armadillos (92%) dispersed from their release sites within the first few days (duration not specified) after release. Only six of the translocated animals were successfully relocated, of which two returned to their original capture sites, and three made long-distance movements away from their release sites. However, all 29 armadillos released at their original capture site remained near their release sites over the same period and maintained stable home ranges (3–30 ha). Between May 2005 and March 2006, forty-one armadillos were captured using long-handled dip nets and unbaited wire cage traps. Twelve armadillos were randomly selected to be translocated and the remainder were released at their capture sites. Translocated animals were released 0.7–8.1 km from their capture site. All individuals were tagged with transmitters and monitored 3–4 times/week for up to 358 days.

Output references

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