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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Short-term landscape-scale effects of forest management on Peromyscus spp. mice within Missouri Ozark forests

Published source details

Fantz D.K. & Renken R.B. (2005) Short-term landscape-scale effects of forest management on Peromyscus spp. mice within Missouri Ozark forests. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 33, 293-301


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forest Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A randomized, replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 1994–2001 in a pine and oak forest area in Missouri, USA (Fantz & Renken 2005) found that thinning and partial harvesting of trees led to a higher abundance of Peromyscus mice spp. Two to five years after harvesting, the annual average number of mice caught in uneven-aged harvesting compartments, where single trees and small groups were felled (8.5–27.0 mice) and even-aged harvesting compartments, involving limited clearcutting and thinning (11.4–31.5 mice) were higher than in uncut compartments (5.9–10.0 mice). Catch data from two Peromyscus spp. were combined. Mice were live-trapped, in two blocks of 144 traps each, in nine compartments (312–514 ha), over six nights each year in April or May of 1994–1995 and 1998–2001. Compartments were grouped in three replicate blocks. Uneven-aged harvesting (three compartments) involved cutting single trees and small groups. Even-aged harvesting (three compartments) involved clearcutting and thinning 10–15 % of trees. Three compartments were uncut. Harvesting was carried out in 1996. Biomass removal was similar between harvesting treatments.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)