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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Clear-cutting and regeneration practices in Quebec boreal balsam fir forest: Effects on snowshoe hare

Published source details

De Bellefeuille S., Bélanger L., Huot J. & Cimon A. (2001) Clear-cutting and regeneration practices in Quebec boreal balsam fir forest: Effects on snowshoe hare. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 31, 41-51


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Remove competing vegetation to allow tree establishment in clearcut areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1991–1996 of a coniferous forest in Québec, Canada (de Bellefeuille et al. 2001) found that, up to nine years after clearcutting, snowshoe hares Lepus americanus were not more numerous in replanted areas where competing vegetation had been removed than in naturally regenerating clearcuts. Data were not fully reported, nor were results of statistical analyses. However, hares seldom used removal plots. Only 5% of vegetation removal plots contained hare faecal pellets during any one survey and no preference for removal plots over those regenerating naturally was identified. Twenty-five sites (6–9 ha) were studied. Ten were clearcut in 1987, replanted in spring 1990, and competing vegetation removed in August 1992. In five sites vegetation was removed using brushsaws, and five using herbicide solution. Fifteen naturally regenerated sites, clearcut between 1987 and 1989, were controls. Hare faecal pellets were counted and cleared in 1 × 5-m plots, in June and September, 1991–1996.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)