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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Responses of small mammals and vegetation to a reintroduction of Gunnison's prairie dogs

Published source details

Davidson A.D., Parmenter R.R. & Gosz J.R. (1999) Responses of small mammals and vegetation to a reintroduction of Gunnison's prairie dogs. Journal of Mammalogy, 80, 1311-1324


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1997 in one desert grassland site in New Mexico, USA (Davidson et al. 1999) found that over half of the translocated Gunnison's prairie dogs Cynomys gunnisonii released in family groups survived at least six months, but none reproduced during the first year. Thirty-six out of 60 (60%) translocated prairie dogs survived the first summer after being released into the wild, but no young were born during this period. In spring 1997 sixty prairie dogs (30 male, 30 female) were translocated to a 3.5 ha area in a former prairie dog colony site. Individuals were released with family members or near neighbours, into the existing burrows of a former prairie dog colony. Prairie dogs were monitored during summer and autumn 1997 but monitoring details are not provided.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)