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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: An integrated program to prevent, mitigate and compensate wolf (Canis lupus) damage in the Piedmont region (northern Italy)

Published source details

Dalmasso S., Vesco U., Orlando L., Tropini A. & Passalacqua C. (2012) An integrated program to prevent, mitigate and compensate wolf (Canis lupus) damage in the Piedmont region (northern Italy). Hystrix, the Italian Journal of Mammalogy, 23, 54-61


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Pay farmers to compensate for losses due to predators/wild herbivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1999–2009 of pasture and forest in Piedmont, Italy (Dalmasso et al. 2012) found that when compensation was paid for livestock losses to wolves Canis lupus and dogs Canis lupus familiaris, an already expanding wolf population continued to grow. Over 11 years, the number of wolf packs increased from five to 20. Over the first five of these years, the annual number of attacks by wolves or dogs on livestock rose from 47 to 156. It then remained between 95 and 154 over the following six years. The scheme was established in 1999 to mitigate farmer-wolf conflict in a region with a recolonizing wolf population. Herders were compensated for livestock losses to wolves or dogs (as it is difficult to differentiate casualties due to these predators) and paid lump sums for indirect damages. From 2006, eligibility required using subsidised predation prevention measures, such as livestock guarding dogs, corrals and night confinement.

(Summarised by Jack Gavigan )