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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: A review of fauna in mine rehabilitation in Australia: Current state and future directions

Published source details

Cristescu R.H., Frère C. & Banks P.B. (2012) A review of fauna in mine rehabilitation in Australia: Current state and future directions. Biological Conservation, 149, 60-72


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Restore former mining sites Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of rehabilitated mine sites in Australia (Cristescu et al. 2012) found that 62% of 13 studies indicated that rehabilitated areas had lower densities and/or species richness of mammals compared to in unmined areas. Seven of 11 studies found that rehabilitated areas had lower mammal species richness than unmined areas, while the other four found rehabilitated and unmined areas had equal or higher mammal species richness. Only two of eight studies found that rehabilitated areas had equal or higher mammal densities compared to unmined areas. Data for individual studies were not reported. Methods combining the use of fresh topsoil with planting seeds and seedlings were most successful for animal recolonization. Studies investigating faunal recolonization of rehabilitated mines in Australia were obtained from the literature, of which 13 of 71 monitored mammals. Studies often compared plots in rehabilitated areas (1–30 plots/study) with plots in unmined areas (1–22/study). Rehabilitated sites were up to 20 years old.