Study

Aversive conditioning of campground coyotes in Joshua Tree National Monument

  • Published source details Cornell D. & Cornely J.E. (1979) Aversive conditioning of campground coyotes in Joshua Tree National Monument. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 7, 129-131

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use conditioned taste aversion to reduce human-wildlife conflict in non-residential sites

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Use conditioned taste aversion to reduce human-wildlife conflict in non-residential sites

    A study in 1977–1978 at a campsite in California, USA (Cornell & Cornely 1979) found that using conditioned taste aversion reduced the number of coyotes Canis latrans that begged for food. Three months after adding lithium chloride (which induces gastrointestinal discomfort) to bait there had been no reported begging problems at the campsite, compared to >12 coyotes begging for food in the month prior to use of lithium chloride baits. Bait was consumed by coyotes 31 times over a 14-day period. From December 1977 to January 1978, meat bait was mixed with lithium chloride at a rate of 10 g/396 g of meat. Bait was left on paper plates at the campsite or thrown to individual coyotes. Animal calls were used to attract coyotes. During baiting, campsite visitors were asked not to feed coyotes. Methods for surveying coyotes were unclear in the original paper.

    (Summarised by: Phil Martin)

Output references

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