Study

Active land use improves reindeer pastures: evidence from a patch choice experiment

  • Published source details Colman J.E., Mysterud A., Jørgensen N.H. & Moe S.R. (2009) Active land use improves reindeer pastures: evidence from a patch choice experiment. Journal of Zoology, 279, 358-363

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Manage vegetation using livestock grazing

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Remove vegetation by hand/machine

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Manage vegetation using livestock grazing

    A replicated, controlled study in 2003–2005 of pasture at a site in northern Norway (Colman et al. 2009) found that sheep-grazed pasture was used by feeding reindeer Rangifer tarandus more than was ungrazed pasture. Reindeer spent more time feeding in low-intensity sheep grazed plots (30% of all feeding observations) and high-intensity sheep grazed plots (28%) than in ungrazed plots (17%). Sixteen plots were established in each of two 0.3-ha fields. Each field contained four plots of each high-intensity sheep grazing, low-intensity sheep grazing and ungrazed pasture. Low- and high-intensity sheep grazing comprised two (ewe and yearling) and four (ewe and three lambs) sheep respectively, for 10 days at the beginning of July in 2003 and 2004, contained within temporary internal fencing. Four 2-year-old male reindeer were grazed on each field for two weeks in autumn 2003, spring and autumn 2004 and spring 2005. Reindeer feeding patch choice was determined by timed observations.

    (Summarised by: Nick Littlewood)

  2. Remove vegetation by hand/machine

    A replicated, controlled study in 2003–2005 of pasture at a site in northern Norway (Colman et al. 2009) found that mown pasture was selected by feeding reindeer Rangifer tarandus more than was unmown pasture. Reindeer spent more time feeding in mown plots (25% of all feeding observations) than in unmown plots (17%). Sixteen plots were established in each of two 0.3-ha fields. Each field contained four replicate plots of high-intensity sheep grazing, low-intensity sheep grazing, mowing and unmanaged. Sheep grazing treatments are not reported on in the paper. Mown plots were cut in July, to 5 cm height, with cuttings removed. Four 2-year-old male reindeer grazed in each field for two weeks in autumn 2003, spring and autumn 2004 and spring 2005. Reindeer feeding patch choice was determined during timed observations.

    (Summarised by: Nick Littlewood)

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust