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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: From the field: capture, hand-raising, and captive management of peninsular pronghorn

Published source details

Cancino J., Sanchez-Sotomayor V. & Castellanos R. (2005) From the field: capture, hand-raising, and captive management of peninsular pronghorn. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 33, 61-65


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Captive rear in large enclosures prior to release Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1998–2003 at a captive breeding facility in Baja California Sur, Mexico (Cancino et al. 2005) found that peninsular pronghorn Antilocapra americana peninsularis taken from the wild and kept in a large enclosure increased in number and provided a suitable resource for future reintroductions. Nine adult pronghorns and 16 fawns were captured in the wild, in 1998–2003, to establish the captive breeding herd. Births in captivity occurred from 2000, with 85 occurring up to 2003. There were 20 deaths. In 2003, the captive population stood at 90 animals. The captive breeding facility measured 1,400 × 1,850 m, with moveable internal divisions to manage animal separations where necessary. The founder animals were wild-caught. Fawns caught wild were bottle-fed until weaned. A different male was used for mating each year.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)