Study

Habitat requirements of the Alpine marmot Marmota marmota in re-introduction areas of the Eastern Italian Alps. Formulation and validation of habitat suitability models

  • Published source details Borgo A. (2003) Habitat requirements of the Alpine marmot Marmota marmota in re-introduction areas of the Eastern Italian Alps. Formulation and validation of habitat suitability models. Acta Theriologica, 48, 557-569

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range

    A replicated study in 1977–2002 in four alpine shrub and meadow sites in the Eastern Italian Alps, Italy (Borgo 2003) found that translocated alpine marmot Marmota marmota populations persisted for at least five years. At the first translocation site, 23 marmot families (28.4 family units/km2) were counted 22 and 25 years after release. At the second site, 13 marmot family groups were counted 16 years after release (13.8 family units/km2). After 12 more marmots were added to the second site in 2001, the population increased to 18 family units in 2002. A further two marmot populations were described as persisting for 5-7 years with 11-16 family groups (assisted by some restocking in one site). In 1977, 1983, 1995 and 1997, alpine marmots were released in four sites (150, 168, 472 and 1,005 ha respectively) in the Friulian Dolomites Natural Park. The number of individuals released is not reported. The origin of animals is not explicitly stated, but releases appear to be of translocated wild marmots. In May 1999–2002, winter burrows were located as marmots emerged from hibernation. Marmots were identified by tracks in the snow and each winter burrow was considered to be occupied by one family unit. Authors state that marmots were released in many isolated areas from the 1960s onward, but introduction was only successful in a few of them.

Output references

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