Study

Roads and macropods: interactions and implications

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Install wildlife warning reflectors along roads

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Install overpasses over roads/railways

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Install barrier fencing and underpasses along roads

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Install wildlife warning reflectors along roads

    A review of two studies in 2000–2010 in Australia (Bond & Jones 2014) found that installing wildlife warning reflectors had mixed results regarding reducing road deaths of mammals. One study showed reflectors prompted increased vigilance and flight by red kangaroos Macropus rufus. Another study showed that reflectors did not reduce the number of Proserpine rock-wallabies Petrogale persephone killed by collisions with vehicles.

  2. Install overpasses over roads/railways

    A review of two studies in 2006–2008 in Australia (Bond & Jones 2014) found that overpasses installed over roads were used by eastern grey kangaroos Macropus giganteus, red-necked wallabies Macropus rufogriseus and swamp wallabies Wallabia bicolor. All road overpasses used fencing to reduce likelihood of animals crossing roads rather than using overpasses. Overpasses in the review were 70 m long and 15 m wide.

  3. Install barrier fencing and underpasses along roads

    A review published in 2014 of eleven studies in Australia (Bond & Jones 2014) found that underpasses, separated from roads by fencing, were used by red-necked wallabies Macropus rufogriseus, swamp wallabies Wallabia bicolor, red-legged pademelons Thylogale stigmatica, long-nosed potoroos Potorous tridactylus and Lumholtz’s tree-kangaroos Dendrolagus lumholtzi. At all road underpasses, fencing was used to deter animals crossing roads rather than using underpasses. Underpasses in the study were 1.2–3.4 m high, 2.4–3.7 m wide, and 20–52 m long.

Output references

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