Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Conservation introduction of the threatened Apennine chamois Rupicapra pyrenaica ornata: post-release dispersal differs between wild-caught and captive founders

Published source details

Bocci A., Menapace S., Alemanno S. & Lovari S. (2016) Conservation introduction of the threatened Apennine chamois Rupicapra pyrenaica ornata: post-release dispersal differs between wild-caught and captive founders. Oryx, 50, 128-133


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A controlled study in 2008–2010 in a mountain site in the Central Apennines, Italy (Bocci et al. 2016) found that released captive-born Apennine chamois Rupicapra pyrenaica ornata survived and reproduced in similar numbers to wild-caught translocated chamois, but captive-born chamois remained closer to the release site. Seven of eight captive-born (88%) and seven of eight (88%) wild-caught translocated Apennine chamois survived over five months after release. Four of five captive-born (80%) and three of five wild-caught translocated (60%) female chamois reproduced in the first year after release. During the first week after release, captive-born chamois remained closer to the release site (within 1.1 km on average) than wild-caught chamois (average 1.8 km). Eight captive-born chamois (2.5–11.5 years old, five females and three males) and eight wild-caught translocated chamois (2.5–10.5 years old, five females and three males) were released into Sibillini Mountains National Park. Chamois were released in groups of one-three individuals; each group was all wild or all captive-born. Captive-born chamois were bred in large enclosures within four national parks. Translocated chamois were taken from a national park approximately 200 km away. All of the 16 released chamois were fitted with radio-collars and monitored for five months after release in 2008–2010.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A controlled study in 2008–2010 in a mountain site in the Central Apennines, Italy (Bocci et al. 2016) found that wild-caught translocated Apennine chamois Rupicapra pyrenaica ornata survived and reproduced in similar numbers to released captive-bred chamois, but captive-born chamois remained closer to the release site. Seven of eight captive-born (88%) and seven of eight (88%) wild-caught translocated Apennine chamois survived over five months after release. Four of five captive-born (80%) and three of five wild-caught translocated (60%) female chamois reproduced in the first year after release. During the first week after release, captive-born chamois remained closer to the release site (within 1.1 km on average) than wild-caught chamois (average 1.8 km). Eight captive-born chamois (2.5–11.5 years old, five females and three males) and eight wild-caught translocated chamois (2.5–10.5 years old, five females and three males) were released into Sibillini Mountains National Park. Chamois were released in groups of one-three individuals; each group was all wild or all captive-born. Captive-born chamois were bred in large enclosures within four national parks. Translocated chamois were taken from a national park approximately 200 km away. All of the 16 released chamois were fitted with radio-collars and monitored for five months after release in 2008–2010.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)