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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Translocation of problem predators: is it an effective way to mitigate conflict between farmers and cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus in Botswana?

Published source details

Boast L.K., Good K. & Klein R. (2016) Translocation of problem predators: is it an effective way to mitigate conflict between farmers and cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus in Botswana? Oryx, 50, 537-544


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate predators away from livestock to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in 2003–2011 of savanna and farmland at several sites across Botswana (Boast et al. 2016) found that nine of 11 cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus translocated away from farms, for livestock protection reasons, survived for less than one year. Eight translocated male cheetahs survived for 46 to at least 981 days (average 106) after release. Three females survived for 21–95 days (average 31) after release. Nine of the 11 cheetahs were known to have died (three were shot and for six, the cause of death was unknown). On one animal, the GPS-collar failed after 981 days and the outcome for one animal was unknown. Twenty-one cheetah social groups, involving 39 animals, were translocated. They were held for 0–16 days and then released 28–278 km from capture sites. Eleven translocated animals were monitored using satellite- or GPS-collars.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)