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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Influence of post-harvest silviculture on understory vegetation: Implications for forage in a multi-ungulate system

Published source details

Boan J.J., McLaren B.E. & Malcolm J.R. (2011) Influence of post-harvest silviculture on understory vegetation: Implications for forage in a multi-ungulate system. Forest Ecology and Management, 262, 1704-1712


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Allow forest to regenerate naturally following logging Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study, in 2008–2009, on three large adjacent coniferous forest sites in Ontario, Canada (Boan et al. 2011) found that, following clearcutting, large-scale natural forest regeneration increased moose Alces alces numbers relative to more intensive silvicultural practices (mechanical ground preparation, replanting and herbicide application) 10 years after felling but not 30 years after felling. The number of moose faecal pellet clumps was positively correlated with the extent of naturally regenerating forest that was felled 10 years previously in areas of 10, 20 and 40 km2 around the stand, but not with the extent subject to more intensive silviculture, nor with the extent felled 30 years previously and subject to either management practice (data not presented). Ten forest stands were felled 10 years previously (five regenerating naturally and five subject to intensive silviculture) and ten were felled 30 years previously (five regenerating naturally and five subject to intensive silviculture). Moose faecal pellet clumps were counted within five circles of 5.65 m radius in each stand between July and early September of 2008 or 2009.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)