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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of habitat fragmentation on the demography, movements and social organisation of the eastern pygmy-possum (Cercartetus nanus) in northern New South Wales

Published source details

Bladon R.V., Dickman C.R. & Hume I.D. (2002) Effects of habitat fragmentation on the demography, movements and social organisation of the eastern pygmy-possum (Cercartetus nanus) in northern New South Wales. Wildlife Research, 29, 105–116


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide artificial dens or nest boxes on trees Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1990–1993 in a rainforest in New South Wales, Australia (Bladon et al. 2002) found that nest boxes were used by eastern pygmy-possums Cercartetus nanus. Over the first 16 months, the average monthly capture rate of eastern pygmy-possums was 33.5/100 nest box checks. Twenty-one months after the study commenced, part of the area was cleared and the average monthly capture rate dropped to 7.8/100 nest box checks. Ninety-eight individual pygmy-possums were caught in boxes over the study. The study was conducted in a 4-ha early regrowth rainforest plot at 1,200 m altitude. Between 28 and 55 nest boxes (the quantity changing through the study) were attached to tree trunks, 1.5–2.0 m above ground and 10–20 m apart. Boxes were made from 18-mm-wide pine wood, and were 17 × 17 cm and 25 cm tall, with a 1.5-cm-wide opening across the front under the lid. In February 1992, 1.4 ha of the study area was cleared by bulldozing and burning. Boxes were checked at least monthly, between June 1990 and December 1992, and in April 1993.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)