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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Efficacy of translocation to control urban deer in Missouri: costs, efficiency, and outcome

Published source details

Beringer J., Hansen L.P., Demand J.A., Sartwell J., Wallendorf M. & Mange R. (2002) Efficacy of translocation to control urban deer in Missouri: costs, efficiency, and outcome. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 30, 767-774


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate problem mammals away from residential areas (e.g. habituated bears) to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1997–2000 of a residential area and a forest in Missouri, USA (Beringer et al. 2002) found that after translocation away from a residential area, white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus had a lower survival rate than did deer that were not translocated. Annual survival after one year for translocated deer (30%) was lower than for non-translocated deer (69%). Among translocated deer, the largest causes of death were hunting (33%) and muscle weakness following capture (‘capture myopathy’; 29%). Among non-translocated deer, roadkill (68%) and hunting (12%) were the largest causes of death. Eighty deer (51 male, 29 female) were caught in a residential area in January–February 1999, radio-collared, and released in a conservation area 160 km away. At the same capture site, additional deer (quantity not stated) were caught, radio-collared, and released at point of capture from December 1997 to March 1998.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)