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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Corridor use and the elements of corridor quality: chipmunks and fencerows in a farmland mosaic

Published source details

Bennett A.F., Henein K. & Merriam G. (1994) Corridor use and the elements of corridor quality: chipmunks and fencerows in a farmland mosaic. Biological Conservation, 68, 155–165


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Create or maintain corridors between habitat patches Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 1989 of woodland blocks and connecting woodland and grassland corridors at a site in Ontario, Canada (Bennett et al. 1994) found that wooded corridors were used by both resident and transient eastern chipmunks Tamias striatus. In total there were 530 captures of 119 chipmunks (68 males, 51 females). Chipmunks were resident (caught in >1 trapping session) in all four woods and were trapped in 14 of the 18 corridors. They were trapped in all 13 corridors that were characterised by mature trees. Just one was caught among the five grass-dominated corridors that largely lacked trees or shrubs. Chipmunks were live-trapped in four woods and 18 corridors across 220 ha of farmland (mostly pasture and crops). Corridors were field margins alongside fences with vegetation ranging from long grass, through shrubs to mature woodland trees. Four trapping sessions were conducted in May–September 1989. Each session comprised four consecutive days trapping in woods and, the following week, four consecutive days trapping in corridors.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)