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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Florida panther reintroduction feasibility study. Final Report. Study Number: 7507

Published source details

Belden R.C. & McCown J.W. (1996) Florida panther reintroduction feasibility study. Final Report. Study Number: 7507. Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission report.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1993–1995 in northern Florida, USA (Belden & McCown 1996) found that following release, most captive-bred and translocated mountain lions Puma concolor stanleyana that had been held in captivity prior to release established home ranges in the release area. Of 19 released mountain lions, 15 established one or more home ranges. Post-release survival periods for these 15 animals are not stated but two were killed (one illegally shot and one killed by a vehicle) and two were recaptured due to landowner concerns or concerns for their survival, 37–140 days after release. Nineteen mountain lions were released in northern Florida in 1993–1994. Six animals were captive-bred, 10 were wild-caught and released within three months and three were caught and released after 3–8 years. mountain lions were radio-tracked daily in February 1993–April 1993 and then for three days/week until June 1995.

(Summarised by Abby Machernis )

Hold translocated mammals in captivity before release Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1993–1995 in northern Florida, USA (Belden & McCown 1996) found that most translocated and captive-bred mountain lions Puma concolor stanleyana that had been held in captivity prior to release established home ranges in the release area. Of 19 released mountain lions, 15 established one or more home ranges. Post-release survival periods for these 15 animals are not stated but two were killed (one illegally shot and one killed by a vehicle) and two were recaptured due to landowner concerns or concerns for their survival, 37–140 days after release. Nineteen mountain lions were released in northern Florida in 1993–1994. Ten were wild-caught and released within three months, three were caught and released after 3–8 years, and six released animals were captive-bred. Mountain lions were radio-tracked daily in February 1993–April 1993 and then for three days/week until June 1995.

(Summarised by Abby Machernis )