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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Financial compensation for damage to livestock by lions Panthera leo on community rangelands in Kenya

Published source details

Bauer H., Müller L., Van-Der-Goes D. & Sillero-Zubiri C. (2017) Financial compensation for damage to livestock by lions Panthera leo on community rangelands in Kenya. Oryx, 51, 106–114


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Pay farmers to compensate for losses due to predators/wild herbivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2002–2013 in a savanna group ranch in the Amboseli–Tsavo ecosystem, Kenya (Bauer et al. 2017) found that after introduction of a scheme to compensate for livestock killed by predators, fewer lions Panthera leo were killed or poisoned by pastoralists. Fewer lions were killed and poisoned during the six years after the scheme started (killed: 6; poisoned: 0) than the six years before (killed: 33; poisoned: 12). The number of livestock killed by lions did not differ significantly between the five years after the scheme commenced (cattle: 47–144/year; sheep and goats: 6–104/year) and the year before (cattle: 109; sheep and goats: 43). The study was conducted in a 1,133-km2 group ranch, inhabited by 17,000 people and 20–30 lions. A compensation scheme for livestock killed by predators commenced in 2008. Livestock owners could claim between 35% and 70% of the market value of depredated livestock. The number of lions killed directly or poisoned was monitored between 2002 and 2013.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)