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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Alternative food and rabbit damage in vineyards of southern Spain

Published source details

Barrio I.C., Bueno C.G. & Tortosa F.S. (2010) Alternative food and rabbit damage in vineyards of southern Spain. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 138, 51–54


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide diversionary feeding to reduce crop damage by mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A controlled study in 2008 at three vineyards in Córdoba province, Spain (Barrio et al. 2010) found that diversionary feeding reduced damage by European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus to common grape vines Vitis vinifera. Grape vines within plots with diversionary feeding had a lower percentage of buds and shoots removed by rabbits (11%) than those without diversionary feeding (21%). However, grape vine yield did not differ between vineyard plots with or without diversionary feeding (both 4.7 kg/vine). At each of three vineyard sites, one plot had diversionary feeding (50 kg fresh alfalfa placed in strips along the edge of the plot each week during the growing season), and a second plot did not. All plots were unfenced. The proportion of buds and shoots removed by rabbits on 15–20 vines/plot was recorded throughout the growing season in 2008. Grape vine yields were estimated during harvest from the number and size of grape clusters on each vine.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)

Install non-electric fencing to exclude predators or herbviores and reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A controlled study in 2008 at three vineyards in Córdoba province, Spain (Barrio et al. 2010) found that fencing reduced damage by European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus to common grape vines Vitis vinifera and resulted in greater grape vine yields. Grape vines within fenced plots had a lower percentage of buds and shoots removed by rabbits (0.5%) and greater yields (7 kg/vine) than unfenced plots (21%; 4.7 kg/vine). Each of three vineyard sites had a fenced plot and an unfenced plot. Fences were checked weekly. No details are provided about the fencing design. The proportion of buds and shoots removed by rabbits on 15–20 vines/plot was recorded throughout the growing season in 2008. Grape vine yields were estimated during harvest from the number and size of grape clusters on each vine.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)