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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Supervivencia de guanacos (Lama guanicoe) reintroducidos con y sin período de preadapatación en el parque nacional Quebrada del Condorito, Córdoba, Argentina [Survival of reintroduced guanacos (Lama guanicoe), with and without pre-adaptation period, in the Quebrada del Condorito national park, Córdoba, Argentina]

Published source details

Barri F.R. & Cufré M. (2014) Supervivencia de guanacos (Lama guanicoe) reintroducidos con y sin período de preadapatación en el parque nacional Quebrada del Condorito, Córdoba, Argentina [Survival of reintroduced guanacos (Lama guanicoe), with and without pre-adaptation period, in the Quebrada del Condorito national park, Córdoba, Argentina]. Mastozoología Neotropical, 21, 9–16


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2007–2012 in a forest and grassland reserve in Córdoba, Argentina (Barri & Cufré 2014) found that captive-bred guanacos Lama guanicoe kept for 38-184 days in large holding pens before release had higher post-release survival than guanacos kept for 3–15 days in small holding pens. Of 25 guanacos kept for 38-184 days in large holding pens before release, 24 (96%) survived the first month of which 19 (79%) survived over one year after release. Of 113 guanacos kept for 3–15 days in small holding pens before release, only 24 (21%) survived the first month of which 17 (71%) survived over one year after release. In 2011 and 2012, twenty-five captive-bred guanacos were kept in a 20,000-m2 holding pen for 38-184 days before release into a 24,774-ha national park. In 2007, 113 captive-bred guanacos were kept in a 1,200-m2 holding pen and fed with alfalfa for 3–15 days before release into the same national park. Guanacos were marked and 42 individuals (6 in 2011 and 36 in 2007) were radio-tagged. Animals were monitored 2–3 times for 4–5 days during the first month post-release and 1–2 times each month for 2–3 days up to one year post-release.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)