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Individual study: A dose–response trial with ziram-treated maize and free-ranging European badgers Meles meles

Published source details

Baker S.E., Ellwood S.A., Watkins R.W. & Macdonald D.W. (2005) A dose–response trial with ziram-treated maize and free-ranging European badgers Meles meles. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 93, 309-321


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use repellents that taste bad (‘contact repellents’) to deter crop or property damage by mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study (year not stated) in a woodland in Oxfordshire, UK (Baker et al. 2005) found that treating corn cobs with the repellent, ziram, reduced the rate of its consumption by European badgers Meles meles. Fewer corn cobs treated with ziram were damaged by badgers (39–63% of cobs) than were untreated cobs (82% of cobs). Among badgers that were repeat visitors to feeding stations, treated cobs were fed on (as opposed to rejected) on a lower proportion of occasions (10–34%) than were untreated cobs (60%). At two sites, 450 m apart, feeding stations were established, each offering 12 corn cobs and water. Sites were pre-baited, to encourage attendance, and the experiment ran for five nights. Cobs were treated, in equal numbers, with 5%, 10%, 20% or 40% ziram in water or with water alone (as an untreated control). Treatments were assigned randomly across cobs.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)