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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Survival of wild and hand-reared ringtail possums (Pseudocheirus peregrinus) in bushland near Sydney

Published source details

Augee M.L., Smith B. & Rose S. (1996) Survival of wild and hand-reared ringtail possums (Pseudocheirus peregrinus) in bushland near Sydney. Wildlife Research, 23, 99–108


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Hand-rear orphaned or abandoned young in captivity Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A controlled study in 1990–1994 in a park in New South Wales, Australia (Augee et al. 1996) found that ringtail possums Pseudocheirus peregrinus released following hand-rearing, or relocated from elsewhere, survived for a shorter time than did resident possums. The average survival of released possums was 101 days and for resident possums was 182 days. There was no difference in survival between hand-reared or relocated possums. Deaths were mostly due to predation by mammals, reptiles and birds. For possums for which their fate was known, predation accounted for 98% of released and 81% of resident animals. Possums were monitored in a 4-km2 park, adjoining a suburban area. Released possums (112) included hand-reared orphaned animals (81) and those relocated from potentially dangerous situations (21). Resident possums (41) were wild animals that had not been moved or held in captivity. Possums were monitored by radio-tracking ≥twice/week.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)