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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Coyote predation on domestic sheep deterred with electronic dog-training collar

Published source details

Andelt W.F., Phillips R.L., Gruver K.S. & Guthrie J.W. (1999) Coyote predation on domestic sheep deterred with electronic dog-training collar. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 27, 12-18


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Deter predation of livestock by using shock/electronic dog-training collars to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in 1997 on pasture at a site in Utah, USA (Andelt et al. 1999) found that electric shock collars reduced the frequency of attacks by captive coyotes Canis latrans on lambs. During week 1 (five coyotes each spending 4–6 hours with lambs) there was a total of 10 attempted lamb attacks. During week 2 (five coyotes each spending two hours with lambs) there was one attempted attack. There were no attempted attacks in week 4, one in week 7 and none in weeks 11, 16 or 22 (five coyotes each spending two hours with lambs during each study week). All attempted attacks ceased upon electric shock administration. Five captive male coyotes (aged 5–9 years), which killed lambs in trials, were studied. Each was fitted with a Model 100 Lite electronic dog-training collar, set at maximum shock intensity. During each trial, one coyote and one lamb were held in a 679 m2 enclosure. Shocks were administered when the coyote actively pursued the lamb.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)