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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Evaluation of translocation of black bears involved in human–bear conflicts in South‐central Colorado

Published source details

Alldredge M.W., Walsh D.P., Sweanor L.L., Davies R.B. & Trujillo A. (2015) Evaluation of translocation of black bears involved in human–bear conflicts in South‐central Colorado. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 39, 334–340


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate problem mammals away from residential areas (e.g. habituated bears) to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in 1995–1997 in an unspecified number of mountain sites in Colorado, USA (Alldredge  et al. 2015) found that after translocation of black bears Ursus americanus that were involved in conflict with humans, fewer than half survived after one year and some returned to capture sites. One year after translocation, 50% of adult black bears and 28% of sub-adult bears had survived. Of 66 captured bears, 14 returned to capture sites and 16 repeated some form of problem behaviour. In May and October of 1995–1997, sixty-six bears that were considered a nuisance or threat to human safety were captured. All were individually marked with ear tags and lip tattoos and were fitted with radio-collars. Within two days of capture, bears were translocated to release sites. Not statedBears were radio-tracked opportunistically, from the ground and from a plane, once a week, in May–October of 1995–1997.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)