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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Taking the elephant out of the room and into the corridor: can urban corridors work?

Published source details

Adams T.S., Chase M.J., Rogers T.L. & Leggett K.E. (2017) Taking the elephant out of the room and into the corridor: can urban corridors work? Oryx, 51, 347–353


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Retain wildlife corridors in residential areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in 2012–2014 in seven semi-arid residential and agricultural sites in northern Botswana (Adams et al. 2017) found that retained wildlife corridors in residential areas were used by African elephants Locondonta africana and 18 other mammal species. There were 2,619 camera-trap images of elephants captured, over 516 days. Elephant activity peaked in August, when 13 elephants/day were detected. Nineteen mammal species in total were recorded, including civet Civettictis civetta and buffalo Syncerus caffer (other species not named). Seven corridors that crossed urban and agricultural areas between a forest reserve and a major river were monitored using camera traps. The seven corridors were either fenced or otherwise ran between developed areas. They were 750–1,700 m long and 3–250 m wide. Camera traps were attached to trees or posts at 1.5–1.8 m high and operated for 24 hours/day from 1 November 2012 to 30 April 2014.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)