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Individual study: No effect of artificial light of different colors on commuting Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) in a choice experiment

Published source details

Spoelstra K., Ramakers J.J.C., van Dis N.E. & Visser M.E. (2018) No effect of artificial light of different colors on commuting Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) in a choice experiment. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological and Integrative Physiology, 329, 506-510


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Use red lighting rather than other lighting colours Bat Conservation

A site comparison study in 2015 of two road culverts near Elburg, Netherlands (Spoelstra et al. 2018) found that culverts illuminated with red light had similar activity of commuting Daubenton’s bats Myotis daubentonii as culverts illuminated with green or white light. The average number of Daubenton’s bat passes did not differ significantly between culverts illuminated with red (43 bat passes/night), green (37 bat passes/night) or white light (39 bat passes/night). Activity was similar when culverts were left unlit (34 bat passes/night). Two light-emitting diode (LED) lamps of three colours (red, green, white) were installed on the ceiling of each of two identical, parallel road culverts (31 m long, 1.6 m diameter) carrying a stream. Different light treatments (unlit; red, green, or white light at 5 lux intensity) were applied simultaneously in each of the two culverts with treatments changed each night over a total of 47 nights in July–August 2015. Two bat detectors fitted alongside the lamps in each of the two culverts recorded bat activity.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)