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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The impact of even-aged and uneven-aged forest management on regional biodiversity of multiple taxa in European beech forests

Published source details

Schall P., Gossner M.M., Heinrichs S., Fischer M., Boch S., Prati D., Jung K., Baumgartner K., Blaser S., Böhm S., Buscot F., Daniel R., Goldmann K., Kaiser K., Kahl T., Lange M., Müller J., Overmann J., Renner S.C., Schulze E.-D., Sikorski J., Tschapka M., Türke M., Weisser W.W., Wemheuer B., Wubet T. & Ammer C. (2018) The impact of even-aged and uneven-aged forest management on regional biodiversity of multiple taxa in European beech forests. Journal of Applied Ecology, 55, 267-278


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use selective or reduced impact logging instead of conventional logging Bat Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2009–2010 of 43 forest sites in central Germany (Schall et al. 2018) found that selectively logged sites had similar overall bat activity and diversity to conventionally logged sites and unmanaged forest. There was no significant difference in overall bat activity (data reported as statistical model results) and bat diversity (data reported as diversity indices) between selectively logged sites, conventionally logged sites and unmanaged forest. Surveys were carried out in 13 selectively logged sites (uneven-aged forest with large diameter overstorey trees harvested every five years), 17 conventionally logged sites (even-aged forest stands of 4–8 ha harvested in rotation) and 13 forest sites unmanaged for 20–70 years. All sites were European beech Fagus sylvatica forest. Bats were monitored in 2009 and 2010 (details of methods not reported).

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)