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Individual study: Experimental evaluation of the initial effects of large-scale thinning on structure and biodiversity of river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) forests

Published source details

Gonsalves L., Law B. & Blakey R. (2018) Experimental evaluation of the initial effects of large-scale thinning on structure and biodiversity of river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) forests. Wildlife Research, 45, 397-410


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forest and woodland Bat Conservation

A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 2012–2015 of 10 forest sites in south-eastern Australia (Gonsalves et al. 2018) found that thinning increased the activity of six of nine bat species/species groups. For six bat species/species groups (Gould’s wattled bat Chalinolobus gouldii, free-tailed bats Mormopterus spp., inland broad-nosed bat Scotorepens balstoni, large forest bat Vespadelus darlingtoni, southern forest bat Vespadelus regulus, little forest bat Vespadelus vulturnus), activity was higher after thinning than before (data reported as statistical model results), whereas activity in control plots was either similar (five species) or decreased (one species). For two bat species/species groups (long-eared bats Nystophilus spp., yellow-bellied sheath-tailed bat Saccolaimus flaviventris), activity was similar before and after thinning, but decreased at control plots. For one bat species (white-striped free-tailed bat Austronomous australis), activity decreased after thinning and in control plots. Two plots (0.1 ha) were sampled in each of 10 forest sites (dominated by river red gum Eucaluptus camaldulensis). Five treatment sites were thinned in 2012–2015 (average 434 stems/ha). Five control sites were left unthinned (average 1,150–1,300 stems/ha). One bat detector recorded bat activity at the centre of each of 20 plots for three consecutive nights in December 2012 (before thinning) and December 2015 (after thinning).

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)