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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Does thinning homogenous and dense regrowth benefit bats? Radio-tracking, ultrasonic detection and trapping

Published source details

Law B., Gonsalves L., Brassil T. & Hill D. (2018) Does thinning homogenous and dense regrowth benefit bats? Radio-tracking, ultrasonic detection and trapping. Diversity, 10, 45


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forest and woodland Bat Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 2016–2017 at eight forest sites in New South Wales, Australia (Law et al. 2018) found that thinned tree stands had higher overall bat activity and activity of little forest bats Vespadelus vulturnus than unthinned tree stands, and long-eared bats Nyctophilus spp. had higher activity in thinned tree stands in the spring but not in the autumn. Overall nightly bat activity (of 10 species/species groups) was higher in thinned (183 bat passes) than unthinned tree stands (97 bat passes) as was the activity of little forest bats (data not reported). Average nightly activity of long-eared bats was higher during spring in thinned (7 bat passes) than unthinned tree stands (1 bat pass), but the reverse was true in autumn (thinned: 3 bat passes; unthinned: 6 bat passes). All eight sites (12 ha) were dense white cypress pine Callitris glaucophylla regrowth separated by ≤200 m. Four sites were thinned in June–July 2016 (average 358 stems/ha) and four sites were left unthinned (average 463 stems/ha). Each pair was surveyed simultaneously with 1–2 bat detectors/stand for two nights in November 2016 (spring) and March 2017 (autumn).

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)