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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Are external mine entrance characteristics related to bat use?

Published source details

Johnson J.B., Wood P.B. & Edwards J.W. (2006) Are external mine entrance characteristics related to bat use? Wildlife Society Bulletin, 34, 1368-1375


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install and maintain gates at mine entrances to restrict public access Bat Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2002 of 24 gated and 23 ungated abandoned mines in West Virginia, USA (Johnson et al. 2006) found that mines with gates had fewer bats captured of nine species than ungated mines, but other mine features were more important than gates for predicting bat presence. The number of bats captured was lower for nine bat species at mine entrances with gates than at mine entrances without gates (data reported as statistical model results). However, mine entrance size, shape and distance to other entrances were more important than gates for predicting the presence of bats (see original paper for detailed results). Twenty-four mine entrances were gated (one had a ‘bat-friendly’ angle-iron design, 23 had a round-bar design with 1.5 cm bars spaced 500 cm horizontally and 200 cm vertically). Twenty-three mine entrances had no gates installed. Bats were captured with harp traps and/or mist nets for one night at 36 of 47 mines in June–July 2002 and at all 47 mines in August–September 2002.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)