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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Reviewing the evidence on mitigation strategies for bats in buildings: informing best-practice for policy makers and practitioners

Published source details

Lintott P. & Mathews F. (2018) Reviewing the evidence on mitigation strategies for bats in buildings: informing best-practice for policy makers and practitioners. Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (CIEEM), UK report.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Create alternative bat roosts within developments Bat Conservation

A review in 2018 of 283 studies of building developments in the UK (Lintott & Mathews 2018) found that just over half of newly created bat lofts and a third of bat boxes were used by bats, and new roosts built to replace destroyed roosts were less likely to be used than existing roosts that were retained and modified. Bats were present in 52% of newly created bat lofts after development, and in 31% of bat boxes (the number of bats using roosts and bat lofts/bat boxes before and after development are not reported). New bat lofts and bat boxes built to replace destroyed roosts were four times less likely to be used by returning bats than roosts retained and modified during reroofing work. Bat lofts and bat boxes were used by common pipistrelles Pipistrellus pipistrellus, soprano pipistrelles Pipistrellus pygmaeus, brown long-eared bats Plecotus auritus and Myotis spp. (see original report for data for individual species). The 283 studies (112 for bat lofts, 119 for bat boxes, 52 for modified roosts; dates not reported) were collected from multiple sources, including practitioner reports and licence applications from across the UK, and reviewed in 2018.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)

Provide bat boxes for roosting bats Bat Conservation

A review in 2018 of 119 studies of building developments in the UK (Lintott et al. 2018) found that a third of bat boxes installed to replace destroyed roosts were used by bats, mainly Pipistrellus spp., and bats were more likely to use bat boxes when a greater number were installed across a site. Bats were present in 31% of bat boxes after development with the majority used by Pipistrellus spp. (27%). A small number of bat boxes were used by brown long-eared bats (2%) and Myotis spp. (2%). The roost status and number of bats using the roosts before and after development are not reported. The probability of at least one bat box being occupied by bats increased when a greater number of bat boxes were installed across a site (data reported as statistical model results). The 119 studies (dates not reported) were collected from multiple sources, including practitioner reports and licence applications from across the UK, and reviewed in 2018.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)