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Individual study: Response of bay scallops to spawner transplants:a test of recruitment limitation

Published source details

Peterson C., Summerson H. & Luettich R. (1996) Response of bay scallops to spawner transplants:a test of recruitment limitation. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 132, 93-107


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate species - Translocate molluscs Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 1992 of four sites of seagrass bed in Bogue Sound estuary, Northern Carolina, North Atlantic Ocean, USA (Peterson et al. 1996a) found that up to six months after translocation, bay scallops Argopecten irradians concentricus survived at all sites. Following translocation, average scallop abundance (representative of survival) at the transplant sites did not significantly change (directly after: 8.0–10.3; 6 months after: 5.9–11.6/0.5 m2) and remained higher than before translocation (0.3–3.6/0.5 m2). In July 1992, adult bay scallops (135,000 in total) were translocated in coolers without water to sites with low scallop densities (0.7/m2). Scallops were deposited in one 30 x 40 m marked area at each site. Bay scallops were counted in 2 m2 quadrats (n=16–24) inside the marked area two weeks before and on five occasions after translocation ending in December.

 

A replicated, before-and-after, site comparison study in 1988–1994 of three to four seagrass bed sites in one to three estuarine locations in Northern Carolina, North Atlantic Ocean, USA (Peterson et al. 1996b) found that translocating bay scallops Argopecten irradians concentricus did not increase larval production but increased recruitment into the adult population compared to before translocation. Larval production was similar before (6–195/sample) and after (5–15) translocation, and remained lower than at sites in other estuaries (55–335). Larval recruitment (as abundance of settled spat) increased by on average 568% at translocation sites, while recruitment at sites without translocation increased (non-significantly) by 34%. In 1992–1994, adult bay scallops (100,000–150,000/year) were translocated in coolers without water to sites in Bogue Sound with low scallop abundance within seagrass beds. Larvae collectors (8–20) were deployed in 1988, 1989, 1992 and 1993 at one translocation site and at two sites without translocation in nearby estuaries (Core Sound; Back Sound). Settled scallop larvae were counted for each collector after two months. In 1988, 1989, 1992, 1993, and 1994 at two translocation sites and the same two sites without translocation, 0.5 m2 plots were dredged (35–61 plots/site) and scallops under 1-year old counted.

(Summarised by Anaëlle Lemasson)